World Cup analysis (of the economic kind)

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I've heard on the grapevine that a little global sports tournament starts today. For many, the host country Brazil will mean football, football, football, but for many manufacturers it means a country of export opportunity.

And for me, the World Cup provides yet another opportunity to dig out some stats to see how various countries stack up. (Well I need to fill my time somehow with my TV tied up for the next month)

This time, we're looking at manufactured exports from the UK to the other 31 competitor nations. Will Brazil be champions? Will Spain storm to victory again? It's all to play for in our stats round up (no penalties).

Knocked out in the first round are the countries in chart 1 - from Honduras with exports worth £10.7m to Greece with £678m.

Chart 1 - Bottom of the league

UK manufactured exports in 2013 to country, £m

Source: uktradeinfo, SITC codes 5,6,7,8

The hosts don't make it to the quarter finals - Brazil knocked out in the last 16 with £2.4bn of UK manufactured exports to there in 2013 (chart 2).

Chart 2 - Quarter final disappointment

UK manufactured exports in 2013 to country, £m

Source: uktradeinfo, SITC codes 5,6,7,8

It's getting serious now (chart 3), but failing to make it to the semis and finals come a quartet of our European neighbours - including 2010 winners Spain; we may export £6.5bn worth of goods there, but it's not enough to take them through.

Chart 3 - So near and yet so far

UK manufactured exports in 2013 to country, £m

Source: uktradeinfo, SITC codes 5,6,7,8

And here we are, the final result - the last four countries in the tournament (chart 4). The Netherlands and France were up there but it wasn't good enough. Germany and the US make it to the final, and with £32.3bn, the stars and stripes of the US take the export trophy.

Chart 4 - The US takes it!

UK manufactured exports in 2013 to country, £m

Source: uktradeinfo, SITC codes 5,6,7,8

PS I know what you're thinking, its a game of two halves and all that - what about our imports from these countries?! Well keep your eyes peeled for further World Cup analysis (of the economic kind) as the tournament progresses.

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Senior Policy Researcher

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